John Kelly, Ph.D.

John Kelly, Ph.D.

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is a worldwide recovery mutual-help organization that continues to arouse controversy. In large part, concerns persist because of AA’s ostensibly quasi-religious/spiritual orientation and emphasis. In 1990, the United States’ Institute of Medicine called for more studies on AA’s effectiveness and its mechanisms of behavior change (MOBC) stimulating a flurry of federally funded research. This talk will review the religious/spiritual origins of AA and its program and contrasts its theory with findings from this latest research.

arriaamelia

Amelia Arria, Ph.D.

Excessive drinking, marijuana use and other forms of drug use can be barriers to academic success during high school and college. These educational outcomes are often under-recognized, but drawing a connection between substance use and student achievement can be a compelling argument to strengthen substance use prevention activities. Similarly, recovery support services are needed for college students to ensure their academic success. This presentation will present research findings on the connection between substance use and academic performance. Novel strategies to reduce substance use and promote recovery will be discussed that involve engaging educational professionals, parents and policy makers, all of whom place a high priority on maximizing youth potential.

marcfishman

Marc Fishman, MD

Prescription opioid and heroin addiction in adolescents and young adults has devastating consequences for youth and their families. The bad news is that youth are highly vulnerable and disproportionately affected by the current epidemic of opioid addiction, and generally to not respond as well as adults to treatment. The good news is that youth do respond to treatment, and that developmentally informed models of treatment are emerging that are likely to improve outcomes.

This year’s honorees:

    • John F. Kelly, Ph.D. – William L. White Life Time Achievement Award for Excellence in the Advancement of Recovery Research
    • Kana Enomoto, M.A. – The Director of the Year Award: For Outstanding Contributions to the Advancement of Recovery Supports by a Federal Office
    • Mark Fishman, M.D. – The Recovery Researcher, Advocate of the Year Award: For Outstanding Contributions to the Advancement of Public Policy through Scientific Data Collection
    • Amelia Arria, Ph.D. – The Visionary Award: For Outstanding Contributions to Youth Recovery Research through the Use of Applied Sciences
    • Thomas G. Kimball, Ph.D., LMFT – The Recovery School Award: For Outstanding Contributions to Recovery Research in an Educational Setting
    • Scott Basinger, Ph.D. – The Spectrum Award: For Outstanding Contributions to Prevention, Intervention and Addiction Recovery Research for Adolescents and Young Adults
    • Stacie Mathewson – Recovery Philanthropist of the Year

John Kelly, Amelia Arria, Marc Fishman, Scott Basinger, and Tom Kimball will engage in a panel discussion about the current state and future of the recovery research field, moderated by Vanderbilt’s Andy Finch.

Scott F. Basinger, PhD

Scott F. Basinger, PhD

The Alternative Peer Group model was created to address the emotional, psychological, spiritual and social needs of teens struggling with substance abuse issues. This unique treatment model integrates the important peer connection with sound clinical practice through intervention, support, education, accountability and family involvement. Our research provides evidence that APG’s are effective because of family involvement, interaction with sober peers, and improved feelings of peer and parent attachment, communication, and attention.

Thomas G. Kimball, Ph.D. LMFT

Thomas G. Kimball, Ph.D. LMFT

The presentation will report on findings and implications of two qualitative research studies. 1) The experience of emerging adults in a collegiate recovery program related to the concept of hope and coping in their recovery, and 2) Parent’s experience of their emerging adult in a collegiate recovery program. Implications of these studies to each other, to future research, as well as to the field of collegiate recovery will be discussed with participants.